Auto Accidents On Flooded Roadways

Contact the St. Louis car accident lawyers at the Bruning Law Firm today.

The old phrase “April showers bring May flowers” doesn’t sound that scary or dangerous. You might think that there is no harm in a few rainy days or some seasonal wet weather. However, when the water levels rise, the rain keeps falling, and flash flooding becomes an obstacle then the traveling the roadways becomes a serious risk.

 

How Dangerous is Flooding for Drivers?

According to national data, flooding is the most common natural disaster, accounting for over 40 percent of the disasters worldwide.1 Flash flooding in particular accounts for 200 annual deaths which is the leading cause of weather related deaths in the United States.2 Flash flooding related drownings also poses a serious risk for drivers and passengers since 50 percent of the deaths are vehicle related.3

What Impact Does Rain and Floods Have on Roadways and Driving?

Bad weather can have significant impact and create substantial issues for drivers. High levels of precipitation can result in local rivers, creeks, lakes, and ponds flooding, which impacts roadways, traffic flow, and the operation of vehicles.4 The impact to roadways is evidenced by decreased visibility distance, increase in pavement friction, and dangerous lane obstructions by moving water and obstacles traveling in the flood waters.5 Traffic flow is impacted since roadway capacity is decreased, traffic speeds fluctuate, there are delays in travel time, and the risk of accidents increase.6 Due to the rain and floods a vehicles performance and operation is effected as drivers have to adjust their behavior and treatments according to unpredictable conditions such as adjusting to traffic signal timing and speed limits.7 This level of impact and issues on roadways created by weather conditions including floods and heavy rainfall results in nearly 1,312,000 vehicle crashes each year.8

What to Do as a Driver on a Flooded Roadway?

It takes a very small amount of water, whether standing or moving water, to cause parked vehicles to move, drivers to lose control of their vehicle as they shift off the road or into other lanes, roads to become structurally unsound, or for dangerous obstacles to move into the flow of traffic. There are precautions that can help a driver navigate flooded roadways such as staying tuned into news updates on road closures, being familiar with the area and alternative routes, obeying road warnings and closures, and avoiding any unnecessary driving during unsafe conditions.

Contact an Experienced St. Louis Car Accident Lawyer for a Free Consultation

Despite taking precautions and knowing the dangers created by flooded roadways, car accidents still occur that can result in significant property damage and personal injury. If you have been in a car accident it is important to discuss the circumstances of your collision with an experienced auto accident attorney who can help you to determine what claims should be filed and what party’s may be liable for contributing to or negligently causing a car accident on a flooded roadway. Contacting the experienced attorneys at the The Bruning Law Firm Law Firm is the first step towards ensuring your rights and interests as a victim of a car accident are protected by recovering the maximum amount of compensation. To contact an auto accident attorney for a free consultation please feel free to call the The Bruning Law Firm trial attorneys at 314-735-8100.

LET US GET STARTED ON YOUR ST. LOUIS CAR ACCIDENT CASE TODAY

If you or someone you care about has been seriously injured in an auto accident, contact The Bruning Law Firm today. We provide the comprehensive, professional legal representation you deserve at a time when you need it most.

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References:

  1. http://floodsafety.com/national/life/statistics.htm
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/weather/q1_roadimpact.htm
  5. Ibid.
  6. Ibid.
  7. Ibid.
  8. Ibid.